Norman Vincent Peale's Legacy on "Hour of Power"

Dr. Peale's granddaughter Katie Allen Berlandi was interviewed about his positive thinking legacy and her work with Guideposts.

By Bobby Schuller, Hour of Power

This conversation between Pastor Bobby Schuller and Katie Allen Berlandi first appeared on Hour of Power and is used by permission.

Katie Allen Berlandi is the granddaughter of the late Dr. Norman Vincent Peale, champion of positive thinking. Katie is a clinical social worker with a private practice focusing on children and families. Katie is actively involved in Guideposts and the Guideposts Foundation, focusing on OurPrayer, military outreach and Comfort Kits for hospitalized children. Bobby Schuller interviews Katie.

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Bobby Schuller: This morning, I am happy to be interviewing our guest, Katie Berlandi. Katie is the granddaughter of the late Dr. Norman Vincent Peale, who was not only a pastor, but an author and a champion of positive thinking. His most famous book is The Power of Positive Thinking, which has sold more than 20 million copies.

Katie and I recently met at a Guideposts event where I was speaking, and I had the chance to meet herself and her mother. It was a great event where I was also able to meet so many of the people who are a part of carrying on Dr. Peale's legacy. Katie and I have formed a friendship, so I invited her to come out to California and be my guest on the Hour of Power.

We're so glad you're here, Katie.

Katie Allen Berlandi: Thank you so much.

BS: I just want to begin by saying what a huge impact your grandfather had on my grandfather's life.

I feel like the big tipping point and breakthrough for this church was when your grandfather came and spoke in the drive-in church years ago. My grandfather, Dr. Robert H. Schuller was a guy that not a lot of people had heard of outside of this state, but everybody knew who Dr. Norman Vincent Peale was. Your grandfather came and preached, and it was the thing that sort of caused our church to explode.

KAB: Yes, and I remember my grandpa saying how clear it was within moments that your grandfather was going to do tremendous things, and he certainly did and still does. So my grandpa and grandma were both very happy to be as supportive as possible to that endeavor.

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BS: Your grandfather was a pastor and what he did for my grandpa personally can't even be measured. He was a tremendous mentor. My grandfather grew up in a very strict Dutch Calvinist environment, with ‘God hates you and he just can't wait to put you into hell, but if you're perfect maybe you'll escape.' Then here comes Norman Vincent Peale who talked about God's love and how we serve a positive God. The timing for my grandfather changed his life radically.

KAB: Well I know my grandfather was humbled about any of that influence. They were great friends, too, and that's an important element, as well.

BS: Katie, here is a question I know you've been asked a lot because I've been asked it a lot myself: what's it like growing up being Norman Vincent Peale's granddaughter?

KAB: Well it was pretty terrific, I might say. Grandma and grandpa's ministry, their world travel, their relationships with world leaders and all of that was not at the forefront when we were together as a family. My siblings and I grew up in a town where my grandparents had a country home so whenever they weren't traveling, they were near to us so that allowed us a lot of very natural, authentic time together.

You know as we all think back on our time growing up with grandparents, over time, the aperture of that lens opens up as we learn more about them. For me, it has been a remarkable experience to learn about the impact and the influence that both grandma and grandpa have had on lives, and I say that with a lot of humility because I know that they felt that, too. Any way they could be helpful, one person at a time, was a gift from God to them.