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Build Your Personal Dream Team

Choose your team wisely. Teammates will make or break you.

By Dan Britton and Jimmy Page

WEB EXCLUSIVE

The “Dream Team” was the nickname given to the 1992 United States men’s Olympic basketball team. It was the first American Olympic team to feature active NBA players, and the results were awesome. As they dominated their way to the gold medal, they beat their opponents by an average of 44 points! Since the Dream Team, the United States has had numerous teams with the best and most talented players, but USA basketball has never been able to repeat the Dream Team’s success.

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We always think the best team consists of the best players. However, the best team is about getting the right players. In the movie Miracle, US Olympic hockey coach Herb Brooks has a classic line when he is selecting the 1980 team. He shows the roster of players who will be a part of the team to his assistant coach, Craig Patrick. Shocked at who is on the list, Craig says, “You’re missing some of the best players.” Coach Brooks responds, “I’m not looking for the best players, Craig. I’m looking for the right ones.”

If you could assemble your own Dream Team, who would be on it? We’re not talking about a sports team, but your own team of godly friends who build you up when you’re down, pick you up when you stumble, guide you when you’re uncertain, and confront you when you’re out of bounds. We all need a few steadfast friends to do life with. Who are the right team­mates to ensure your personal and spiritual success? Who will be in your “inner circle,” walking with you through thick and thin, pouring God’s wisdom into your mind and heart?

...Getting the right people on your team and understanding the role they play is essential. Life gets complicated quickly, and without those key people, it can get over­whelming. When we go with the flow, we drift toward complexity. However, when we are intentional, we drive toward clarity. You can create relational clarity by defining  relationships. We’ve identified four key relationship—what we call the WisdomWalker’s Dream Team—namely, Walker, Watchman, Warrior, and Workman. It’s the perfect blend of mentoring, accountability, and discipleship. Without these key relationships, it will be increasingly more difficult for you to live a life that matters—a life of influ­ence. We need an inner circle that brings us to Jesus, because in Christ is the fullness of wisdom.

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Christ is the power of God and the wisdom of God. This foolish plan of God is wiser than the wisest of human plans, and God’s weakness is stronger than the greatest of human strength. 1 Corinthians 1:24–25

All you need to become a WisdomWalker is to have the personal desire and the practical discipline to walk like Jesus and make a difference in the lives of those you care about. You can be a catalyst for generational change by investing in others! Ultimately, the fruit of a WisdomWalker grows on other people’s trees.

Here’s our formula for WisdomWalkers:

Wisdom – Relationships = Nothing

No matter how much godly wisdom you have, unless it is infused into relationships, it’s worth nothing. The power of wisdom is not quantity but context. As we grow in Christ, there should be a natural growing of our relationships, because our God is a relational God. As godly wisdom increases, relationships become richer and fuller. There is always a direct connection between wisdom and relationships.

This article is excerpted from Wisdom Walk Sports: 40 Game-Changing Principles for Athletes, Coaches and Teams (Summerside Press 2012) by Dan Britton and Jimmy Page.