The Story Behind "War Horse"

A boy's miraculous interaction with a horse inspires a best-selling novel, an award-winning play and a hotly anticipated movie.

By Michael Morpurgo, Iddesleigh, Engladn

As appeared in

This year has truly been an extraordinary one for me as a writer. I’ve seen my novel, War Horse, become a hit play in the U.K. and on Broadway, and now the acclaimed director Steven Spielberg has brought the story to life on the silver screen.

Rather surprising for a book I wrote 30 years ago, a book I never would have written if it hadn’t been for a chance meeting with a World War I veteran and then a miraculous conversation I overheard one evening.

The story begins, as the novel itself does, in Devon, England.

In 1975 my wife, Clare, and I moved to the tiny village of Iddesleigh, about 200 miles west of London. Clare and I left our jobs as teachers and bought an old Victorian manor house and a few acres of farmland just outside of town.

We had a dream of establishing a farm where children from the cities could spend a week out in the country. They would get a chance to milk the cows and clean the dairy, herd the sheep, care for the horses, collect the eggs and feed the pigs.

We believed the experience would help the children learn how their hard work could make a difference, building their confidence and self-esteem.

We called our program, simply enough, Farms for City Children. Primary-school students ages eight to 12 came to the farm for a week and stayed in the manor house.

Clare had grown up around farms. I, however, was raised in the city and had never made hay or mucked a cowshed in my life. I learned right along with the children from the farmhands.

By far my favorite animals were the horses. To me they were the most beautiful and gentle creatures, and they were truly wonderful with the children.

Farms for City Children was a great success. We received busloads of 36 to 40 students nearly every week of the school year.

Despite how busy we were, this new life in the country allowed me to spend more time writing. After three years, I had published four books for children, which sold well enough for my publisher to ask for another.

One late November day I was waiting for a bus of primary school farmhands to arrive from the industrial city of Birmingham. But my mind was on a conversation I’d had earlier in the year. I felt moved to write about it, but I didn’t quite know how.

It was summer and I was eating a late lunch at the village pub when I spotted an elderly gentleman sitting alone at a table by the fireplace.

I recognized him as one of the three World War I veterans who lived in the village. I bought him a pint and took it over to his table.

“I heard you were in the First World War,” I said, offering him the pint and sitting across from him.

“Well, you heard right,” he said. “I went when I was seventeen. It was the first time I ever left home.”

He talked about how hard it was to be so far from home, and how it was to live in the mud of the trenches on the Western Front.

“But at least I was there with horses,” he said.

Horses? I had to know more.

The old man invited me back to his cottage, where he showed me mementos from his time in the cavalry. He spoke at length about his horse. At one moment, his eyes filled with tears.

“You know,” he said, “my horse was really my only friend over there. I talked to him.”

“What do you mean?” I asked.

“At night I would head alone over to the horse lines to feed them. When I got to my horse, I would tell him all of my troubles and fears.

"The other soldiers were as terrified as I was. So there was no way I could tell them how frightened I was, how much I missed home. The only person I could talk to was my horse.”

He called his horse a person. They were that close.

Later I spoke to the two other veterans in the village. They too had been close to the horses they rode into battle. I did some research and visited the Imperial War Museum in London.

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Your Comments (2)

Dear Mr. Morpurgo,

Animals do have such a unique way of reaching right into our hearts and extracting our true feelings. Personally, I love horses, elephants and dogs, not necessarily in that order. I've never ridden horses nor an elephant for that matter, though I've had a cocker spaniel. When I think of these 3 types of animal, the words that come to mind are majesty, strength, spirit, boundless love, care,generosity, nuturing, intelligence among others.
You have such a brilliant story to tell, even though you penned it 30 years ago. There are no coincidences you know. God has a plan for that movie. I predict, tons of people will be affected by 'War Horse'in a positive way.
God bless

Enola

Loved the story of the War Horse and I can tell you how wonderful a relationship can be with a horse or dog...we dont give them credit for all they understand and react with us....it's amazing and God put them on the earth to take care of us...there's a story to that effect in the book "His Mysterious Ways" copyright 1988 pg 71, entitled "Out of the Night"...read...