Fresh Summer Vegetable Succotash with Basil

Fresh summer veggies make up this Southern-style side dish.

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- Posted on Jun 9, 2008

Fresh Summer Vegetable Succotash with Basil

This recipe is a multi-pot process, not my usual modus operandi of simply executed recipes involving as few dishes as possible. (I like to cook, not do dishes.) It's also a bit larger than many of my vegetable dishes—it makes for delicious leftovers.

Succotash has many versions, but all contain corn and beans. If butter beans are not available, I often substitute shelled edamame or black-eyed peas. Small farm stands, local and state farmers markets and even the Whole Foods in my area usually carry shelled peas and butter beans in the summer. They are both doubly precious—extremely delicious and fairly expensive, the result of the luxury of not having to shell your own.

Ingredients

2 c. shelled fresh butter beans (about 1½ pounds unshelled) or frozen butter beans 1 onion, preferably Vidalia, chopped
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper Scraped kernels from four ears fresh sweet corn (about 2 cups); see instructions below
½ lb. small Yukon Gold potoatoes, halved 1 small yellow squash, chopped
2 Tbsp. canola oil 1 small zucchini, chopped
2 Tbsp. unsalted butter 1 c. grape, cherry or teardrop tomoatoes, halved

Preparation

1. To cook beans, place them in a pot and cover with cold water. Bring to boil over high heat and season water with salt and pepper.

2. Decrease heat to low and simmer until tender, about 30 minutes for fresh beans, less for frozen. Drain well and set aside.

3. To cook potatoes, place them in a second saucepan and cover by 1 inch with cold water; season with salt.

4. Bring to boil over high heat, then decrease the heat to low and simmer until just tender, about 20 minutes.

5. Drain in a colander and set aside.

6. In a large, heavy-bottomed skillet, heat 1 tablespoon oil and 1 tablespoon butter over high heat until the foam subsides.

7. Add the drained potatoes and season with salt and pepper.

8. Cook the potatoes, stirring infrequently, until nicely crusted, 8 to 10 minutes. Transfer to serving bowl.

9. In the same skillet, heat the remaining oil and butter over medium-high heat.

10. Add onion, corn, squash and zucchini and cook, stirring, until crisp-tender, about 5 minutes.

11. Stir in reserved butter beans and cook, stirring, until heated through.

12. Add potatoes along with the tomatoes and fresh basil, stirring to combine.

13. Taste and adjust for seasoning with salt and pepper. Server hot, warm or cold.

Cutting Corn Off the Cob

There are gadgets to cut the corn kernels off the cob, but a sharp knife will do the job well. Most people stand the corn vertical to a cutting board and the kernels go everywhere. Instead, set the ear of corn on its side and, using a chef's knife, slice away the kernels on the four "sides," squaring off the round ear. The kernels will fall away, but not having far to go, will not scatter. Then, stand the ear on one end and cut away the "corners" of the cob. Finally, scrape the milky remainder into a bowl with the back of knife.

Nutritional Information:  Calories: 90; Fat: 3.5g; Cholesterol: 5mg; Sodium: 85mg; Total Carbohydrates: 13g; Dietary Fiber: 2g; Sugars: 3g; Protein: 3g.

Bon Appetit, Y'allReprinted with permission from Bon Appetit, Y'all: Recipes and Stories from Three Generations of Southern Cooking by Virginia Willis, copyright © 2008. Published by Ten Speed Press. Photo credit: Ellen Silverman © 2008.

 

 

 

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