Prayer Stories

Prayer stories nurture faith and renew hope. The power of prayer can't be denied. Prayer can change circumstances or change perspectives, transforming lives and strengthening faith. Anyone who has ever experienced an answered prayer knows that every prayer story is a chance to move forward in your faith journey, relationships, career, or health.
Flash prayers of love for Lent

Love a Little at Lent

Flash prayers—how to intentionally spread some love and peace

Valentine's Day and Ash Wednesday

Love, Mortality and Lent

On Valentine's Day and Ash Wednesday, a reminder that the most important thing we can do while we’re on earth is to love generously, passionately, unselfishly.

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A red rose rests on a closed Bible.

A Sign of Answered Prayer

The landlady's prayer advice helped this family save their store.

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Make Your Lenten Confession Fun

Make Your Lenten Confession Fun

How one family takes a meaningful look at misdeeds and then, at Easter, redemption

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Lenten Prayer Program

Join Our Lenten Prayer Program

Sign up for our free 40-day Prayer Program and draw closer to God this Lenten Season!

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Janeshia Adams-Ginyard

She Prayed Her Way into a Role in the Marvel Film 'Black Panther'

Stuntwoman Janeshia Adams-Ginyard on how prayer helped her land a role on one of the biggest films of 2018.

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Pray according to God's ability, not yours.

Pray According to God’s Ability, Not Yours

Stop stressing about praying “right” and rely on God’s willingness to hear—and answer.

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Staying spiritually fit

Staying Spiritually Fit

Don’t let life’s daily distractions pull you from time spent drawing closer to God.

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A close up of an older and younger patient holding each other's hands for help.

A Heaven-Sent Hospital Roommate

The perfect roommate calmed her fears.

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How an empty chair can help you pray

How a Chair Can Help You Pray

Prayer is just a simple matter of having a conversation with Jesus. So pull up a chair for Him.

How to pray for your pastor

8 Ways to Pray for Your Pastor

If you want a great church and a strong spiritual life, here's the best way to make that happen.

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A large group of people praying

How Does God Hear All Our Prayers at Once?

We asked Dr. Elizabeth Berne DeGear, a biblical scholar and chaplain, a big spiritual question: How does God hear all our prayers at once?

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Prayer Tips with Ty'Ann Brown

Prayer Tips with Ty'Ann: Selfless Love

When you feel down and need a boost of God's love, turn to this prayer tip from Ty'Ann.

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A military chaplain finds hope

Overcoming the Unimaginable

A military chaplain shares how he finds the promise of comfort and strength in the middle of war and death.

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For God, who said, “Let light shine out of darkness,” made his light shine in our hearts to give us the light of the knowledge of God’s glory displayed in the face of Christ. 2 Corinthians 4:6 NIV

Lent is a blessed time of year, a time to devote yourself to developing a closer relationship with God. In the coming days, you have the magnificent opportunity to deepen your faith and reflect on the life and message Jesus shared with the world.

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Sabra CiancanelliFeb 7, 2018

Prayer Tips with Ty'Ann: Renewed Strength

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Are you looking for a way to renew your strength in 2018? Instead of placing your hope on people or things that can disappoint you, focus on the Lord and experience outcomes that exceed your expectations.

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Brian and his wife, Angie, had long prayed for a child, but he began to fear their entreaties were in vain—until they paid a visit to Pastor Rosalie.

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Brett LeveridgeJan 2, 2018

As December comes to an end, most people reflect on the past, anticipate the New Year ahead and consider how it will differ from this year. We may feel mixed emotions. While some had to say goodbye to loved ones, others said hello to newborns. Some felt they accomplished a lot, while others felt a sense of disappointment. With all that happened throughout the year, the chance to begin fresh in the New Year can be exciting. If we pray, work hard and keep our faith, we can accomplish many things.

Without a strong and positive mindset, reaching our New Year’s goals and facing life’s obstacles can be more difficult than need be. Life has a way of throwing things our way that we often can’t anticipate. As we prepare for the New Year, let us focus on the Word to sustain us through life’s ups and downs. The Word increases our faith and gives us spiritual strength. Here are seven biblical verses for the coming year:

1)  “…but those who hope in the LORD will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.” (Isaiah 40:31)

2)  “For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the LORD, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.” (Jeremiah 29:11)

3)  “Trust in the LORD with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight.” (Proverbs 3:5-6) 

4)  “I have told you these things, so that in me you may have peace. In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world.” (John 16:33)

5)  “Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God.” (Philippians 4:6)

6)  “But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control. Against such things there is no law.” (Galatians 5:22-23)

7)  “I can do all this through him who gives me strength.” (Philippians 4:13)

As we close one year and begin another, let us move forward with confidence as God is always with us. And let us turn to scripture in good and bad times to help us maintain a positive faith-filled mindset. As the psalmist said, “Your word is a lamp for my feet, a light on my path” (Psalm 119:105). What is your Scripture for the New Year?  Please share with us.

Lord, let Your word light our path in the New Year.

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Here's help in keeping a positive, faith-filled mindset for the year ahead.

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7 Bible verses for the New Year
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Life, Faith & Prayer
Pablo DiazDec 21, 2017

7 Bible Verses for the New Year

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Prayer Tips with Ty'Ann: Speak Life

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Ty'Ann Brown shares the power behind using positive words. When you speak life, you change the world around you.

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Recovering from a life-threatening illness, Guideposts Executive Editor Rick Hamlin was afraid he might never sing again

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Ashley LateefDec 1, 2017

A pipe burst in the apartment two floors above us this morning. By 5:14 a.m., when I awoke to the sound of water, our bedroom was already flooded a quarter inch deep. We quickly moved our belongings out into the hallway, grabbed a mop and towels, and then switched to baling with a dustpan. Buckets later, the deluge stopped: our building’s super had turned off the water.

Cleaning up was messy and tedious. Then, just as I sat down to have a cup of coffee, the ceiling over our bed buckled and fell.

Still, no one was hurt. Only a few things of value were damaged. Yes, our place was a mess, and yes, there was an annoying amount of work to do, but we still had a place to live. We had access to electricity and running water.  We even had hot coffee and milk to put in it. Our indoor waterfall was inconvenient, but hardly a crisis.

Over the weekend I’d I spoken with a friend who is dealing with a real crisis: He has spent the past month running Red Cross shelters in Florida in the wake of Hurricane Irma. He told me of people who were homeless, and others who were homeless-and-mentally ill. There were the homeless-and-addicted, the homeless-and-undocumented and the homeless-and-frail.

So, while I muttered to myself as I wrung rust-colored water from sopping-wet towels, I was well-aware that as problems go, mine was an easy one. It was, in fact, easy enough that I decided that instead of grumbling I should be praying: for those who lack clean water, who lack permanent shelter, whose lives are in upheaval from natural disasters. And, too, for the heroes who help them.

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Learning to tell the difference between an inconvenience and a crisis

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Seeds of Devotion
Julia AttawayOct 24, 2017

A Problem To Be Grateful For

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If you’ve never taken a prayer retreat, you are missing a great opportunity to draw closer to God and experience blessing and breakthrough in your spiritual life. I’ve certainly experienced that in my own life, and so I am often on the lookout for new and welcoming places to take a prayer retreat. I’ve enjoyed the hospitality of several Catholic monasteries and retreat centers, thanks to the monastic tradition in Orthodox Christianity. Below is a list of some of the places I have visited and others I hope to visit someday (you don’t have to be Catholic or Orthodox to schedule a retreat at any of them):

1.  The Abbey of the Genesee (Piffard, NY)
The Abbey of the Genesee is home to approximately 30 Trappist monks. It is located in the picturesque Genesee River Valley of western New York. The monastic enclosure encompasses about 1,200 acres of forest, ravines, rolling hills and a meandering creek. They provide three houses for retreats: Bethlehem retreat house is ideal for individual silent retreats, while the Bethany and Nazareth houses are used for group retreats.

2.  Mepkin Abbey (Moncks Corner, SC)
This silent Cistercian monastery was established in 1949 on the historic Mepkin Plantation on the Cooper River, north of Charleston. It offers silent retreats both short (1-6 nights) and long (30 days). Vegetarian meals are provided. Retreats can be booked online. 

3.  The Abbey of Gethsemani (Trappist, KY)
Founded December 21, 1848, and made an abbey in 1851, Gethsemani is situated on more than 2000 acres of farmland and considered to be the "mother house" of all Trappist and Trappistine monasteries in the U.S. It is also the oldest monastery in this country that is still in use and is famous as the home of Thomas Merton. They schedule Friday-to-Monday retreats or Monday-to-Friday retreats in their air-conditioned guest house.

4.  St. Meinrad Archabbey (St. Meinrad, IN)
St. Meinrad Archabbey in south-central Indiana (near Evansville) was founded in 1854 by monks from the 1000-year-old Swiss abbey of Einsiedeln, where St. Meinrad lived and died. Today, it is a thriving community of 90 or so monks which also includes a seminary (more than a 100 seminarians studying for the priesthood), theological school, publishing house (Abbey Press), gift shop and extensive grounds. The guest house at St. Meinrad is very comfortable and the meals are top notch. 

5.  The Monastery of the Holy Spirit (Conyers, GA)
This monastery, begun in 1944 by 21 Trappist monks from the Abbey of Gethsemani (above), offers weekend and Monday-to-Thursday retreats, for which they request a donation of $80-$100 per person, per night. Most rooms have a shared bath.

6.  Saint John’s Abbey (Collegeville, MN)
Located in central Minnesota on 2,740 acres of woodlands and lakes, Saint John's Abbey welcomes guests of all faiths and accommodates 12-15 people. Single and double rooms are available ($70/$95 night), as well as suites ($120/night). Group rates are also available. Meals are provided (extra cost). You can also arrange to meet with a spiritual director regularly (usually once a day). 

7.  The Monastery of Christ in the Desert (Abiquiu, NM)
The Monastery of Christ in the Desert is located in the beautiful Chama Canyon wilderness in northwestern New Mexico, about 75 miles north of Santa Fe. The Benedictine monks there maintain a guesthouse for private retreats where men and women can stay for a minimum of two days and two nights (shorter stays would not help guests enter into the experience). Guests usually stay several days, a week, or even longer (stays of longer than a month require the approval of the abbot). There are nine single and three double rooms for a maximum of 17 people at the main guesthouse. A ranch house also offers three double rooms.

8.  St. Anthony's Greek Orthodox Monastery (Florence, AZ)
This beautiful monastery, begun by six monks from Greece in 1995, can be enjoyed by non-Orthodox Christians. A dress code (long sleeves, long pants or skirt, head scarves for women) is observed. Separate quarters and meals are provided for men and women.

9.  The Abbey of Our Lady of New Clairvaux (Vina, CA)
This monastery is a community of Cistercian monks living the Rule of Saint Benedict. They offer one-day, weekend and week-long retreats, as well as a long-term guest program. It is small, though—only six single guest rooms and two rooms for married couples (each guest room includes a private bathroom).

10.  The Monastery of the Redwoods (Whitethorn, CA)
Begun in late 1962 by four Cistercian nuns, The Monastery of the Redwoods is located in a breathtakingly beautiful area of the Lost Coast of northern California. The sisters—not monks—offer their hospitality either from Thursday until Sunday or full week retreats from Monday until Sunday. The meals are vegetarian.

If none of these strikes close to home for you (literally or figuratively), there are many more that can be found using a quick online search. Chances are good that a welcome awaits at a monastery, convent or retreat center near you. 

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A great opportunity to draw closer to God and experience blessing and breakthrough in your spiritual life.

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Prayer retreat
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A Thousand Ways to Pray
Bob HostetlerOct 23, 2017
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10 Great Places to Take a Prayer Retreat

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Join Us for Children's Day of Prayer

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Guideposts Outreach Coordinator, Lexy Curtin, talks about Guideposts Comfort Kit Program and invites you to send prayer requests for the kids and grandkids in your life! Join us for Guideposts Children's Day of Prayer, September 6th.

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The sermon started, and I found it hard to concentrate. A weird sound made it harder. Phhhhtp! Phhhhtp! I looked to my left and saw a woman thumbing the edge of the hymnal. She lifted the pages with her thumb and let them fall against it, over and over again. It started to get on my nerves. Didn’t she realize that others could hear the noise?

I glared in her direction, but it she was oblivious. With an audible sigh I re-directed my attention to the preacher. Sort of.

A moment later (phhhtp!) I had to say a quick prayer for patience. I considered asking the woman nicely to stop. But my prayer abruptly turned my thoughts in another direction, and I found myself reflecting that the reason people do things like mindlessly run their fingers over the pages of a book is that they are anxious and the sensation is soothing.

I said another prayer, this time for wisdom. When it came to specks vs planks in eyes (Matthew 7:3), it was clear my distractability was far more of a problem than the noise of my neighbor in the pew. The sound would hardly be audible if my heart was truly attuned to the preaching.

Sigh. If I allowed myself to be charitable instead of annoyed, I understood that the ever-flipping pages were the sound of someone coping with her anxiety so that she could listen to the sermon. Could I perhaps be gracious enough to allow her to pay attention?

I decided I could. Or at least I could try. And if I couldn’t pay attention myself, I could certainly pray during the sermon for this woman, so that whatever comfort she needed would be given to her.

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An annoying distraction in church leads to some insight–and wisdom.

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What to do when you're annoyed.
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Seeds of Devotion
Julia AttawayJul 18, 2017

When Others Get on Your Nerves

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