Love Is in the Air

If God takes the time to make even insect love stories beautiful, writes guest blogger Diana Aydin, surely he works wonders on us humans too.

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Flirting fireflies by Tsuneaki Hiramatsu/Smithsonian.com

Today’s guest blogger is Mysterious Ways associate editor Diana Aydin.

The other day, I received a letter from one of our writers. You can read her amazing story–about finding love in the most unexpected of ways–in the next issue of Mysterious Ways magazine.

Something at the end of her letter really stuck with me. “God has such a sense of humor,” she wrote. “And he designed romance!”  

Hmm. I’d never really thought of God in that way. A sense of humor, yes. But God as a romantic? It certainly would explain all the great love stories of our time, like one of my favorites from Mysterious Ways. Still, I had my doubts. If God is so romantic, why are some of us without love on the most romantic of days, Valentine’s Day (like the writer of this blog post!)?

Then I came across this intriguing image from Smithsonian magazine. At first it’s hard to tell what it is exactly. Sequins? Lanterns? Old Christmas lights someone forgot to take down? Look closer, though, and you’ll see something far more stunning: It’s fireflies... flirting!

Photographer Tsuneaki Hiramatsu set out to capture the flight paths of fireflies, a.k.a. lightning bugs, during mating season. It’s a glimpse into a world that few people get to see.  

“Fireflies are little seen in areas developed by human beings,” Hiramatsu says. “When I feel the splendor and mystery of nature, I am glad to have everyone share that feeling. ”

Fireflies attract one another through blinking codes. The result? A breathtaking pattern of twinkly lights.

Well, that had me convinced! If God takes the time to make even the love stories of lightning bugs beautiful, surely he works wonders on us humans too.

What do you think? Is God the greatest romantic in the entire universe? Comment below or share your thoughts with us on Facebook!

Photo credit: Tsuneaki Hiramatsu/Smithsonian.com

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